David's Testimonial

The premier of the 2017 Recovery Street Film Festival on 1st September is fast approaching, and participants are hard at work bringing their own stories to life. But what if you’re still not convinced that the festival is right for you? David McCollom, filmmaker of the 2016 winning entry ‘Hope Inside,’ has created a video explaining why individuals should enter their own film into the Recovery Street Film Festival. Using just an iPad, David also shows just how easy making a video can be.

How to make a short film

The Recovery Street Film Festival gives individuals who have a lived experience of recovering from drug or alcohol addiction a platform with which they can tell their own stories through short films. However, for someone who’s never attempted this before, making a film may seem like an almost impossible task. Where do you begin? What equipment should you use? How do you put it all together? Luckily today’s technology makes it easier than ever for anyone to bring their stories to life. Here are three simple steps that will help take you from an idea all the way to a finished film ready to premiere at the Recovery Street Film Festival.

Step 1: Planning

Example of a storyboard

Example of a storyboard

This step makes all the difference when it is time to film. Here is where you brainstorm exactly what the topic of your film will be, and create an initial storyline and script (even if it just an outline). Remember: a good story has a beginning, middle and end. Although it isn’t mandatory, it may be helpful to create a storyboard as well. A storyboard is a panel-by-panel outline of each shot that helps determine the sequence of each scene. This helps you plan out the shots to get when filming in order to save time.

Step 2: Filming

Now you’re ready to go out and shoot your film! You may be thinking that you need a professional camera to do this but maybe what you need is already in your hand. These days it is possible to shoot an entire film using just a mobile phone. As long as there’s a camera on it, you’re ready to shoot. For more tips on how to make the most out of your mobile device, click here. Remember: videos take up a lot of storage space on mobile devices, so make sure there’s plenty of room before you begin.

Step 3: Editing

Once you’ve gathered all the footage you need, it’s time to get creative and edit it all together. Editing is where you can have fun with music and special effects, and even cut out parts you no longer need. This may seem overwhelming, but there are plenty tutorials available online to help at every step. But what program should you use? That all depends on you! There are numerous free programs available to download right onto your mobile device or desktop, including some that come already installed. For Windows devices, Windows Movie Maker is ready and waiting to help finalize your film, and for Apple devices there’s iMovie. Both are very user friendly.

And that’s it! That’s all you need to know to help get started with creating your short film. Need some more tips? There are even more resources waiting on the Recovery Street Film Festival website. Ready to enter the competition? Rules and instructions can be found here.

Recovery Street at ICCAD Conference

Action on Addiction hosted the first international recovery film event of its kind at the ICAAD conference (International Conferences on Addiction and Associated Disorders) on Monday 1st May.

The event entitled, ‘Street and REEL Recovery International Film Festival’ showcased films about recovery from addiction, made by amateur film makers in both the UK and USA – showing winning films from Recovery Street Film Festival, as well as short films by Leonard Lee Buschel, a former California substance abuse practitioner and founder and director of the eight year old REEL recovery film festival.

Participants from treatment centres all over the world attended the conference which was held in the Royal Garden Hotel in Kensington, London, and many participated in the evening event.  This was also opened up to members of the public.  

The ‘independent cinema’ experience, which offered comfortable seats and free popcorn hoped to demonstrate through the medium of film the diverse issues that are faced by people overcoming addiction and how those around them can be affected.

After watching the short films from both sides of the Atlantic, the audience participated in a Q & A session, chaired by David Charkham, a long time recovery coach.  He facilitated the panel which comprised Leonard Buschel, Lisa Bryer (Producer of the Last King of Scotland and RSFF judge), James Cohen (ITV documentary maker) and Zachary Adler (Writer/Producer).

The aim of both annual festivals is to empower people affected by addiction by giving them a voice, providing a platform for them to tell their own stories of the ‘ups and downs’ and how they reached recovery. The films highlighted the problems that are confronted when someone is attempting to regain their place in society: to gain new friends, to revive links with family, secure a home and get a job.

This was the first time both festivals have come together to showcase their organisations.
Film submissions for this year’s Recovery Street Film Festival competition are open until Friday 4th August 2017. 

For more information on REEL Recovery Festival, please visit: www.reelrecoveryfilmfestival.org
 

2017 Judges announced

We are delighted to announce the 2017 Recovery Street Film Festival Judges. Many of whom have supported and volunteered their time since the festival started in 2014. 

The organising committee are extremely grateful for their input, expertise and ongoing support.

This years theme, Making Up for Lost Time, was developed with the help of Emma Wakefield, a RSFF judge. This theme could mean anything to you - things you wish you'd said, regrets, 24 hours you'll never get back. We'd love your creative take on this - in 3 mins. It's about the message and storytelling, not how technical the film is. 

Find out more about how to make your film here

Emma Wakefield, Recovery Street Film Festival Judge

Emma Wakefield, Recovery Street Film Festival Judge

Submissions open for fourth Recovery Street Film Festival

The Recovery Street Film Festival, which encourages people to submit three-minute films conveying their experience of drug and alcohol addiction, has officially launched for the fourth consecutive year.

This year’s competition theme ‘Making up for lost time’ is encouraging people to give an honest and personal account in an innovative way. This could be thinking about something that you wish you had said, regrets that you would undo or 24 hours that changed your life.  The organisers hope that this year amateur film makers will use their storytelling to help others see the world through their eyes, or even learn from their experiences.

Once submissions are closed the films will be shortlisted and a winner selected. The shortlisted films are shown at various locations across the UK throughout September, the official month of recovery, and on the Recovery Street Film Festival website in order to raise awareness of recovery and address stigma.

The festival aims to empower people affected by addiction by giving them a voice and an opportunity to tell their own stories of recovery, whilst challenging stereotypes of what an ‘addict’ is like.

Martine Bell of HMP Wymott, whose film ‘Hope Inside’ won the competition in 2016, said: ‘Film makers are being encouraged to think creatively about how they tell their stories. The festival is all about reducing stigma around addiction and empowering people in the process. Creativity and content, rather than high production value, are most important – a low budget doesn’t mean a bad film!’

HRH The Duchess of Cambridge attended an event in November 2016 where she met the founders, representatives of the organising charities, and the film-makers from the past 3 years. The Duchess said: ‘The stories told by the film makers in the Recovery Street Film Festival play a real part in helping to break the stigma of addiction. These inspirational short films highlight the complexity of living with addiction, whether it is the film-makers’ own experience, or exploring the impact it has had on their families. But above all, they serve as an inspiration to those who have yet to start their journey to recovery, showing that there is a life after addiction, and even when people have hit rock bottom, they can truly turn their lives around.’

In 2015, a total of 3,674 people died from drug poisoning in England and Wales. Drug-related deaths are currently at the highest ever level. The aim of the Recovery Street Film Festival, therefore, is to break down stigma by opening up conversations and to show what recovery can look like.

Film submissions are open until Friday 4th August 2017. To submit your film, visit the Recovery Street Film Festival website: http://www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk/.

Harry's story

A difficult childhood and mental health problems pushed Harry into a drug-using world at a young age.

His film 'Harry's story' became the winning entry in the first ever Recovery Street Film Festival, set up by a consortium of addiction charities including Blenheim as a way of exploring drug and alcohol addiction through the medium of film.

Here he shares his incredible story of overcoming addiction, meeting the Duchess of Cambridge and now using his own experience to help others. 


"Hi! My name is Harry and I’m a recovering addict.

Recently I was privileged enough to meet with the Duchess of Cambridge at the fantastic event for Recovery Street Film Festival. As well as meeting her, I was able to meet and talk to some amazing people who had overcome incredible difficulties and addiction. Hearing their stories was one of the most moving experiences I’ve had in a long time. So let’s hope you find mine to be as interesting as I found those stories.

When I was born my mother and father were living in Moscow at the time, so when I was just two weeks old they decided to force a plane full of people to endure a wee laddie’s first experience of pressure changes. I spent two years living in Moscow with my family before flying back to London again to live here for about 3 years. Then we moved to Prague, the capital of the Czech Republic, for about three years, before coming back to London to live here again for about six years. Can you see the pattern here?

It was when I was about 13/14 I moved to Italy to be with my dad, and that’s where it all started really. Me and my friends would ditch school to go smoke weed and drink beers, which is…not an entirely unpleasant thing to do in Italy it has to be said. It was in Italy that my mental health started to take a turn for the worse though. It continued to deteriorate when I moved to Scotland and continued to get worse and worse as the years went by.

In Italy it was more isolated incidents, where there would be the odd night of depressive episodes, but in Scotland it became a lot more prevalent. I started to self harm, for the most part just superficial scratches really, but it was then that I started going to Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) in earnest. I was a day patient for a few months in that I would be going nearly daily for group sessions etc. It wasn’t until I came down to London again that I started to take more volatile substances to deal with the mounting pressure of my mental health.

I was diagnosed with symptoms of Borderline Personality Disorder, severe depression, and psychosis, so drugs were an escape from it all. It was a luxury to feel like you were normal back then, and the drugs helped you to feel it. It was easy to become addicted to the sensation of feeling what I believed everyone else felt, namely being normal.

Harry speaks to HRH Duchess of Cambridge about his story

Harry speaks to HRH Duchess of Cambridge about his story

Meeting the Duchess was a daunting and borderline terrifying experience. I was incredibly nervous about the idea of having someone like The Duchess see an interview where I was at my worst. It was a strange mixture of humbling privilege and tongue tying terror, but ultimately one of the most amazing experiences of my life. Having her there has had such an amazing impact on the publicity for the event which is brilliant because I can’t think of a better way to raise awareness about a great project doing amazing work with some truly incredible people.

I can only hope to emulate the level of dedication and effort that they put in with my own job working for Catch 22, which incidentally was the charity that helped me combat my substance misuse.

Ain’t the world a small place like that?"

Royalty and Recovery: a showcase event

On 3rd November HRH the Duchess of Cambridge attended a showcase event for the Recovery Street Film Festival.

The Duchess watched the winning films from the past three years and met filmmakers, supporters and those involved in the organising and running of the festival.

Ceri, 2015 winner for her film Understanding Mum, talks about the event, how the experience has helped her and hopes for the future of the festival.

My mum was an alcoholic, and my childhood was very chaotic and unstable. I always thought I could fix my mum and kept the alcoholism a secret from everyone. I still meet a lot of challenges with self- esteem and anxiety due to this. My mum died when I was 21 so I feel a huge gap in my life at times. I’m now married with 2 children and want to ensure I give them the best childhood possible!

The showcase event was amazing, and really reminded me of the importance of the festival, from the great venue, inspirational speeches, watching the other films, to meeting the Duchess of Cambridge. I felt privileged to have been asked to attend. On a personal level it was a huge achievement for me to even attend the event as I get quite anxious, but I was put at ease by staff and guests, and particularly the Duchess as she had such an empathetic, caring manner, and seemed genuinely interested in my story.

HRH the Duchess of Cambridge speaks to Ceri about her film

HRH the Duchess of Cambridge speaks to Ceri about her film

I hope that the Duchess’s presence will help put the festival in the spotlight and raise awareness of it and the great partnership work between the charities involved. If the exposure encourages people to watch the films it will hopefully help change perceptions of addiction and show those in recovery that they aren’t alone in their journey to motivate them to make changes in their lives. It would be fantastic if this inspires more people to enter the competition and others to come forward to help fund the festival for years ahead.

It has really inspired me to do more to use my past to raise awareness and help others to have a positive future.

Initially I entered to raise awareness of the difficulties faced by being the child of an alcoholic, and I didn’t realise at first, but the main benefit to making the film was that after having my son I was again processing the grief of losing my mum. The film helped me remind myself that mum was controlled by alcoholism and it wasn’t my fault, and has really helped me move on. I felt for the first time I was able to show my true childhood, as I had always tried to protect my Mum and keep it a secret. It has also really helped my confidence and acceptance of myself and the person I have become and what I have achieved.

Since getting involved with the festival I have written a piece for the National Association for Children of Alcoholics (NACOA), who also showed my film in the House of Commons to raise awareness during Children of Alcoholics week. Recently I have felt able to show the film closer to home, and decided I’d like to use it to help my local community. I have spoken to Sure Start Children’s Centres, who are now going to use it with their vulnerable parents group, and I am in discussions with the charity Home-Start to hopefully include it in their training programme.

HRH The Duchess of Cambridge attended Recovery Street Film Festival event

We are thrilled to announce that HRH The Duchess of Cambridge attended a Recovery Street Film Festival event at Working Title in London, the home of numerous highly acclaimed British films such as Bridget Jones, Notting Hill and Love Actually.

Her Royal Highness, who is Patron of Action on Addiction, one of the consortium of addiction charities which make up the Recovery Street Film Festival, arrived at the venue at 6pm.

The Duchess and invited guests were welcomed to the venue by Eric Fellner, the Producer behind many of Working Titles films and he spoke of the link between film-making and improved mental health.  Graham Beech, Chief Executive of Action on Addiction also spoke of how proud Action on Addiction was to be part of the RSFF and how the event was a celebration of the festival, stating that “… many of us here today knows someone in recovery, living their lives freely, helping others to move their lives on. The story or the film doesn't have to end badly”. 

Co-creator of the RSFF, Bob Campbell of Phoenix Futures informed The Duchess how the RSFF came into being, and how, in its third year “…it continues to meet its key objective in raising awareness of addiction and the impact that it has on individuals, families and communities, [which has been] achieved by agencies and service users working together, taking a fresh approach to delivering our message”. 

RSFF judge and Trustee of Action on Addiction, Lisa Bryer, a film producer who produced such films as ‘The Last King of Scotland’, told how film was an integral part in her own recovery from heroin addiction as it helped her escape from the mundanities of life and truly inspired her.

As well as meeting representatives from some of the charities involved in the organising and running of the festival the highlight of the evening was when The Duchess watched the winning films from the past three years; ‘Harry’s Story’, ‘Understanding Mum’ and ‘Hope Inside’

David McCollom, who was involved in the making of this year’s winning film and whose own film came second in the competition, gave an inspirational speech about overcoming his own devastating addiction, and how film was a positive force in his life, not only using film himself, but setting up his own media company to help and inspire others dealing with addiction and struggling with recovery.

The Duchess then went on to a second film-related event about addiction recovery, the world premiere of ‘A Street Cat Called Bob’  - a true story about a homeless man addicted to heroin, whose life changed when a stray ginger cat appeared in his life, and consequently helped him stay in recovery. 

Recovery Street Film Festival to launch at Rio Cinema in Dalston

The Recovery Street Film Festival, which celebrates people’s journeys to recovery from drug and alcohol misuse, is launching for the third year running on Wednesday 7th September.

The launch event is open to the general public and will take place from 12 – 1:30pm at the Rio Cinema in Dalston, London. Mark Dempster, a former drug addict who turned his life around to become an addiction counsellor, will be hosting the event.

Get your free tickets here

A total of ten shortlisted films will be screened on the day, each three minutes long. A winner will then be announced with prizes for those in 1st, 2nd and 3rd place.

In 2014, a total of 3,300 people died from drug poisoning in England and Wales, the highest number since records began. The aim of the Recovery Street Film Festival, therefore, is to break down stigma by opening up conversations and to show what recovery can look like. The festival empowers people who have been affected by addiction, by giving them a platform to talk about their experiences of recovery and how they have overcome barriers.

Mitch Winehouse, father of singer Amy Winehouse endorsed the festival, stating: ‘Sadly we don’t hear much about recovery in the press or on TV, and as a result people who are struggling with addiction don’t know that they have got a chance. People have got to know that recovery is out there and it is possible.

‘Recovery is a concept that means different things to different people, and the Recovery Street Film Festival is a great opportunity to share their unique stories about how they or a loved one turned their lives around.’

The shortlisted films will be shown on the Community Channel on throughout September, broadcasting 24/7 on Virgin 269, Sky 539 and Freesat 651.

Recovery Street Film Festival 2016 welcomes short films from public

The public are being invited to make three minute films about addiction. The Recovery Street Film Festival, now in its third year, asks people with personal or family experience to make short films about recovering from drug or alcohol misuse.

The competition opens for submissions today, 12th of April, and closes on the 29th July. The winning films, picked by a panel of experts, will be shown at locations across the UK.

The Recovery Street Film Festival is led by a group of drug and alcohol treatment charities, including Action on Addiction, Addaction, Adfam, the Amy Winehouse Foundation, Blenheim, Phoenix Futures and Turning Point.

Mitch Winehouse, father of singer Amy, endorsed the festival, stating “Sadly we don’t hear much about recovery in the press or on TV, and as a result people who are struggling with addiction don’t know that they have got a chance. People have got to know that recovery is out there and it is possible. Recovery is a concept that means different things to different people, and the Recovery Street Film Festival is a great opportunity to share their unique stories about how they or a loved one turned their lives around.”

The aim of the festival is to break down stigma by opening up conversations, and show what recovery can look like. The festival empowers people who have been affected by addiction, by giving them a platform to talk about their experiences of recovery and how they have overcome barriers.

Ceri Walker, who won last year’s Recovery Street Film Festival with a moving film about her mother’s alcoholism said –“I think that in the future the Recovery Street Festival could be a great way for people to work through their own stories and celebrate their recovery. It's also a great creative output and really improved my confidence. These films could help all the charities involved educate others of the impact drugs and alcohol have, and show others they aren't alone in their journey and motivate them to make changes to their lives.”

You can find more information about how to make and submit your film here

Launch of the 2nd Recovery Street Film Festival: ‘My Story’

Following a successful first year in 2014, the 2nd Recovery Street Film Festival is launched today, with the theme ‘My Story’. It is a competition for people to tell their stories through film of how they achieved recovery from substance dependence.

A judging panel of film industry experts will be selecting short 3-minute films to feature at ‘pop-up’ street cinemas. These will appear at a planned series of Recovery Street Film Festival events around the country in September where the best films will be shown to the public to challenge traditional views about overcoming addiction.

Last year’s competition included some very high quality entries illustrating the impact addiction can have on individuals and how those around them can be affected. The competition is open to anyone, regardless of their skill in film making. The group or individual making the winning film, chosen by the judges, will receive £1000 worth of film related prizes.

The theme of the Recovery Street Film Festival 2015 is ‘My Story’, which offers an opportunity for those who have experienced issues with drugs or alcohol, to tell their stories through film. The films from the 2014 competition highlighted how those who have experienced dependency can achieve recovery, restoring ties to family, finding new friends, a stable home and employment and training opportunities.

The Festival has been organised by a partnership of drug and alcohol treatment providers and charities including Phoenix Futures, Turning Point, Action on Addiction, Angelus Foundation, CRI, Addaction, and Blenheim CDP.

‘The competition will run from 5 May until 20 July with films shown 12-26 September 2015 around the UK. Qualifying films, including those not selected by the judges for the festival, will also be available to watch and share on http://www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk

Founder of the Amy Winehouse Foundation, Mitch Winehouse backed the competition: “I am delighted to lend my support for this year’s Film Festival. Last year was an outstanding success and I am confident this year’s will also include some extremely inspirational stories. Film is probably the best medium to get those important messages across to the public about people overcoming the misuse of substances, including legal highs but particularly alcohol. We need to challenge those misconceptions about addiction and how people have pieced together their lives deserve respect like everyone else. “

First screening of festival films at launch in London

Yesterday the Recovery Street Film Festival officially launched in London. The festival was opened by Rosanna O’ Connor, Director of Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco at Public Health England and Mitch Winehouse , founder of the drugs and alcohol charity The Amy Winehouse Foundation, to a packed Market Hall in Borough Market, London.

Organised by a consortium of addiction treatment providers including Phoenix Futures, Turning Point, CRI, Blenheim and Action on Addiction, supported by Public Health England, Alcohol Concern and Drugscope, the festival aims to celebrate and promote recovery from substance misuse.

The launch saw the premier of the official festival films on the subject of recovery, chosen by a panel of film professionals including award winning documentary film maker Emma Wakefield, film producer Lisa Bryer, whose credits include The Last King of Scotland and psychologist, writer and documentary film maker David Cohen.

Mitch Winehouse also announced the official festival winner, ‘Harry’s Story’, made by the Community Film Unit.

Gareth Bowler, one of the finalists said; “It is great to see ‘Sober’ touring the country, being seen by so many people from so many places. I wanted the film to reach as many people as possible; this is about the best reach it can get.”

Paul Scully, another finalist said; "I have wanted to "shout out loud" how great it feels to come out the other side from my addiction. This felt like the perfect opportunity to show and tell others that there is hope and that you don't have to live your life in darkness!"

The festival will now move to a number of ‘pop up’ locations on the streets of Cardiff, Birmingham, Liverpool and Glasgow; returning to London to close. 

Well done and thanks to all the finalists and everyone who submitted a film, each and every film shows that recovery is possible and everyone deserves a future. 

Announcing our 10 film shortlist

We are very excited to be able announce the 10 films shortlisted for screening at the Recovery Street film Festival events this month.

The 10 films will be screened exclusively at our festival events before being made available on our website at the end of September.

Jurek    

Four years ago Jurek (Jerzy Stuglik) was an alcoholic, he was homeless, he couldn't see a way to escape the streets and his problems. Today Jurek revisits the park where he used to sleep and tells the story of his recovery.

On Road              

Our film features three of the Building Futures Peer Supporters at HMP Pentonville: three men starting out on their recovery journeys ahead of their release from prison. They each reveal their childhood ambitions and how drugs prevented them from achieving their dreams, before reflecting on their hopes for life after addiction and jail. For life On Road.

Sober   

Sober is a short documentary about facing your worst fears head on and in doing so becoming a stronger version of yourself. More detail here http://www.sobernation.com/sober-film-gareth-bowler/Directed shot and edited by Gareth Bowler

Harry’s Story     

20-year-old Harry Doherty discusses how he became addicted to drugs, the impact this has had on his mental health and the start of his recovery journey.

My old address

"Not even a total eclipse can fully block the light of a true star - abstinence is a light that burns deep within each of us!" This film was made by Paul Scully and filmed by Manus Cross, Employee Communications Officer at Turning Point

On a good day  

In this short film we tell the story of addiction & related social problems through the experience of Tony's 1st Niece, Denise.  The film highlights the ripple effect of addiction, whilst focussing on the benefits of recovery and restitution. Denise describes the constant worry and anguish that both her and Tony's Mother experienced as a result of Tony's criminal activity and drug use. The film ends with Tony visiting his mother, drug free, crime free and expressing his love and appreciation for her continued love, loyalty, hope and support.

Leila     

The film features Leila who is from Doncaster and over the last couple of years has moved to Sheffield. Leila has a long history of drug use and associated issues and accessed rehab in Sheffield through Phoenix House. Leila attends mutual aid regularly and has recently completed a mentor programme to come back to Doncaster to help others.

Vicky’s Story     

Vicky's Story was made by Spectrecom Films, directed by Peter Ford (Spectrecom), with overall creative direction from Annie Houston (Turning Point Marketing Department).

Follow Recovery Road  

Our film alludes to the story of the Wizard of Oz, using the search for courage, heart and wisdom as the basis for the reintegration with society that is part of the 'road to recovery'.  The characters all have to find within themselves - through the over

Richard

The film demonstrates the challenges that an individual faces throughout the life of addiction however despite those challenges an individual can make positive changes.

Find out when and where to see the shortlisted films.

View Long listed films.

 

Mitch Winehouse to open first Recovery Street Film Festival

On 10 September the Recovery Street Film Festival will host its official launch in Borough Market in London. The festival will be opened by Mitch Winehouse, founder of the drugs and alcohol charity The Amy Winehouse Foundation.  Mitch Winehouse will also announce the overall festival winner, who will be awarded with £1000 worth of film related training and prizes.

Organised by a consortium of addiction treatment providers including Phoenix Futures, Turning Point, CRI, Blenheim and Action on Addiction, supported by Public Health England, Alcohol Concern and Drugscope, the festival aims to celebrate and promote recovery from substance misuse.

The launch will see the premier of the official festival films on the subject of recovery, chosen by a panel of film professionals including award winning documentary film maker Emma Wakefield, film producer Lisa Bryer, whose credits include The Last King of Scotland and psychologist, writer and documentary film  maker David Cohen.

Following the Borough Market launch, the festival will move to a number of ‘pop up’ locations on the streets of Birmingham, Cardiff, Liverpool and Glasgow; returning to London to close.  All qualifying films, including those not selected by the judges will be made available to watch and share online (www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk) promoting a greater insight into addiction and recovery.

Hundreds of thousands of people are directly affected by drug and alcohol problems and many thousand will, at this moment, be facing the challenge of achieving and sustaining long term recovery. The Recovery Street Film Festival aims to challenge existing preconceptions about addiction and show that recovery is possible and everyone deserves a future.

Mitch Winehouse says, "Since the creation of the Amy Winehouse Foundation our lives have been touched by the wonderful examples of human endeavour exhibited by those who have battled with and overcome addiction. We have built an incredible programme at the Foundation employing people in recovery to carry out vital prevention work in schools, our staff and volunteers share their experiences of addiction and emotional wellbeing issues to empower young people to make healthier choices and reach out for help if they need to. 

This film festival is another great example of Britain’s recovery community giving something back to society and reaching out to share their stories, and hopefully in turn save lives. In doing so they humbly shine a light on themselves and expose the incredible people they are today.”

Rosanna O’Connor, Director of Alcohol, Drugs and Tobacco at Public Health England said:

“The passion, energy and determination of the recovery community never fails to amaze us, and they are our greatest asset in spreading the word that recovery is possible for everyone. This film festival will help to show that we should all have high ambitions for what people can achieve as they overcome their addiction.

The journey to recovery from addiction is challenging and daunting,  and different people need different things to get there – including  jobs, a decent place to live, families and friends – as well as whatever treatment people might need to help them work towards getting their lives back. At the same time, it’s vitally important that the voices of those who have achieved this are heard, so that others can be inspired to face their futures, with their own high ambitions for recovery, whether for themselves or for a loved one.”

Lisa Bryer, Film Producer, who is a Trustee of Action on Addiction and a Recovery Street Film Festival judge said;

“I am honoured to be part of jury for the Recovery Street Film competition!  Film has played a very important part in my recovery life.  Right from an early age I was able to lose myself in a good film, give myself a break from all my self-loathing and terrible insecurities.  Even during the worse days of my active addiction I would hold on to the fact that after working on a film, that if I ever did recover from this terrible disease, I would at least have found an interest in something that I could be good at.  For the last 33 years of being clean and sober, being a film producer has been one of the best things that ever happened to me.  I love film, I love making a good story come alive.  I love the whole process of putting a film together. Good luck to all our budding film makers!”

ENDS

You can find out more about the Recovery Street Film Festival at www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk  or you can follow the action on Twitter at #RecoveryStreet

The Recovery Street Film Festival will launch in Borough Market on Wednesday 10th September at 12.30pm. The festival will be open from 9.00 am.

For further information please contact either:

James Armstrong james.armstrong@phoenix-futures.org.uk

Helen Deeson H.Deeson@blenheimcdp.org.uk

Matt Hopkins matt.hopkins@turning-point.co.uk

or Amanda Thomson Amanda.Thomson@actiononaddiction.org.uk

Thank you

A huge thanks to everyone that entered a film into the Recovery Street Film Festival (RSFF) competition – we received a fantastic selection of short films! Over the next month, out of all submissions, ten films will be shortlisted by our expert panel of judges www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk/judging-panel/and then showcased at festivals around the country in September 2014.

Come along to a festival near you!

10th September 2014 – RSFF launch, Borough Market - London 
12th September 2014 – RSFF Day 2, Queen Street - Cardiff 
16th September 2014 – RSFF Day 3, Victoria Square - Birmingham 
19th September 2014 – RSFF Day 4, Paradise Street - Liverpool
22nd September 2014 – RSFF Day 5, St Enoch Square - Glasgow 
30th September 2014 – RSFF Closing Event, Tri-Borough location TBC - London 

7 Days to go!

We are into the last week of the Recovery Street Film Festival Competition. That means you have 7 days to get your entries edited, uploaded and submitted to our website. 

Well done to everyone that has managed to get their entries in to us already, some of them have been fantastic and we are pleased that the standard has been so high.

For those of you still working on yours, let us know if you need any more help. Good luck

https://twitter.com/recoveryfilms

http://www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk/submit-a-film/

Festival dates announced

We are so excited to be able to announce the dates and locations for our street film festivals around the UK.

**10th Sept London – Borough Market**
**12th Sept Cardiff – Queen Street**
**16th Sept Birmingham – Victoria Square**
**19th Sept Liverpool – Paradise Street**
**22nd Sept Glasgow – St Enoch Square**
**30th Sept London – Tri-borough (tbc)**

Entries for the competition close on Monday 28th July 2014
http://www.recoverystreetfilmfestival.co.uk/festival-days/

Watch this space for more information about each event